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1. What is a CCD barcode scanner?

CCD (Charged Coupling Device) barcode scanners use an imaging engine to take a picture of the barcode and then decode the characters. CCD barcode scanners are "linear imagers" meaning that you will still see a red focus line when triggering the scan.

 

2. Are all barcode scanners the same?

All barcode scanners function in fundamentally the same manner: The scanner produces a beam of light, which it uses to detect the width of the bars in a barcode and the spaces between them. The difference between laser scanners and imagers is in how they detect these bars.

 

3. What is the difference between 1D and 2D barcode scanner?

1D barcodes can be scanned with traditional laser scanners, or using camera-based imaging scanners2D barcodes, on the other hand, can only be read using imagers. ... That data could be easily encoded on very small 2D barcodes.

 

4. Can 2 items have same barcode?

The answer to this is YES. Although the manufacturer may have one barcode for the product, the reseller (retailer) may put their OWN barcode on the product, thus having the same product with 2 separate barcodes.

 

More:

CCD (Charge Coupled Device) scanners are similar to digital cameras in that they have hundreds of tiny LED lights arranged in one long row that capture a digital image of the barcode. They generally have very fast scan rates but limited read ranges (less than 3 inches) compared to a laser or imagerscanners. CCD scanners are also lower cost than other scanner types making them a great choice for point-of-sale and lower volume scanning applications where distance reading is not a concern.

 

Unlike 1D barcodes, 2D (two-dimensional) codes contain information both horizontally and vertically, allowing them to store much more data. For example, a single 2D code can hold up to 3,116 numeric characters or 2,335 alphanumeric characters, compared to the 39 characters that Code 39 can hold.

All 2D codes have built-in error correction, similar to the check digits in some 1D codes, which effectively eliminates misreads. Within a single 2D Data Matrix code, the data is typically encoded three times, which significantly increases the chances the code will be read correctly.

While 1D codes have quiet zones and guard patterns to identify where the code starts and stops, a 2D code has a quiet zone, a finder pattern, and a clocking pattern. The finder pattern is the L-shaped pattern located around the outside edge of two sides of the 2D code. This is used to ensure proper orientation during decoding. Opposite the finder pattern is the clocking pattern, a series of alternating black and white modules (or cells) that defines how big a single cell is and the size of the code (number of rows and columns) for decoding. The quiet zone is similar to that of 1D barcodes; for 2D codes, however, it must surround the entire code.

Common 2D codes include: Data Matrix, used by aerospace, defense, printed media and the U.S. Postal Service; MaxiCode, a dot-based code that is used in logistics applications; QR codes, used in automotive and commercial marketing applications; and Aztec codes, used by ticket agencies and rental car companies.

Common 2D codes include: Data Matrix, used by aerospace, defense, printed media and the U.S. Postal Service; MaxiCode, a dot-based code that is used in logistics applications; QR codes, used in automotive and commercial marketing applications; and Aztec codes, used by ticket agencies and rental car companies.